Permaculture: A Designers' Manual

by Bill Mollison - 574 pages - 1988 Back To Booksexternal image designers_manual_with_shadow.jpg Read and download this book online for free from sribd (Preview)

Description

"An encyclopedic treatment of permaculture, this book is essential for students, landowners, public policy-makers, and others interested in revolutionizing modern farming and land use. Highly detailed chapters cover everything one might ever need to know about the permaculture philosophy and its applications to land-use design, systems analysis, climatic factors (including tailored strategies for drylands, aquaculture, and other special circumstances), and much, much more" (this book in goodreads)
"It is the textbook and curriculum for the 72-hour Certificate course in Permaculture Design. Written for teachers, students and designers, it follows on and greatly enlarges on the initial introductory texts, Permaculture One (1978) and Permaculture Two (1979) both of which are still in demand over twenty years after publication. Very little of the material found in this book is reproduced from the former texts. It covers design methodologies and strategies for both urban and rural applications, describing property design and natural farming techniques." (this book at powells)

Keywords: Acacia acid animals aquaculture areas Australia banks beds biocides biogas bioregional Casuarina chicken chinampa clay climates cold comfrey complex compost cool create crop cucurbits culture dams deep desert desertification develop drains dryland dunes earth edge effect energy erosion essential ethical evaporation factors farm fences fertiliser Figure fire fish flood flow forage forest fruit garden grass grasslands green manure greywater growth heat humid humus increase infiltration intercrop irrigation land landscape legumes Leucaena livestock manure mulch natural nitrogen nutrients palms pasture pattern permaculture pits plants pollution polyculture ponds production rain rainfall range reduce rock root run-off salt sand seed settlement shade shelter silt slopes soil species storage strategies streams supply surface swales tanks temperature terrace Tilapia trees trellis tropical trust vegetation village vines walls waste weeds wind windbreak yield

Content

Topics include :
  • water management
  • soil improvement
  • techniques and design strategies for both urban and rural applications
  • trees and their energy transactions
  • waste management
  • energy efficient architecture
  • legal strategies and trusts
  • effective working groups
  • right livelihood
  • money and finance
  • ethical investment
  • bio-regional organisation
  • effective aid

Table of Content

  • Cover story
  • CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION, 1
    • 1.1 The philosophy behind permaculture, 1 •
    • 1.2 Ethics, 2 •
    • 1.3 Permaculture in landscape and society, 6 •
    • 1.4 References, 9.
  • CHAPTER 2 CONCEPTS AND THEMES IN DESIGN, 10
    • 2.1 Introduction, 10 •
    • 2.2 Science and the thousand names of God, 11
    • 2.3 Applying laws and principles to design, 12 •
    • 2.4 Resources, 16 •
    • 2.5 Yields, 18 •
    • 2.6 Cycles: a niche in time, 23 •
    • 2.7 Pyramids, food webs, growth and vegetarianism, 28 •
    • 2.8 Complexity and connections, 30 •
    • 2.9 Order or chaos, 31 •
    • 2.10 Permitted and forced functions, 31 •
    • 2.11 Diversity, 32 •
    • 2.12 Stability, 33 •
    • 2.13 Time and yield, 33 •
    • 2.14 Principle summary, 34 •
    • 2.15 References, 35.
  • CHAPTER 3 METHODS OF DESIGN, 35
    • 3.1 Introduction, 36 •
    • 3.2 Analysis: Design by listing characteristics of components, 37 •
    • 3.3 Observation: Design by expanding on direct observations of a site, 43 •
    • 3.4 Deduction from nature: Design by adopting lessons learnt from nature, 44 •
    • 3.5 Options and decisions: Design as a selection of options or pathways based on decisions, 47 •
    • 3.6 Data overlay: Design by map overlays, 47 •
    • 3.7 Random assembly: Design by assessing the results of random assemblies, 47 •
    • 3.8 Flow diagrams: Design for work places, 48 •
    • 3.9 Zone and sector analysis: Design by the application of a master pattern, 49 •
    • 3.10 Zoning of information and ethics, 57 •
    • 3.11 Incremental design, 58
    • 3.12 Summary of design methods, 58 •
    • 3.13 The concepts of guilds in nature, 59 •
    • 3.14 Succession: evolution of a system, 64 •
    • 3.15 The establishment and maintenance of systems, 65 •
    • 3.16 General practical procedures in property design, 68 •
    • 3.17 Principle summary, 69.
  • CHAPTER 4 PATTERN UNDERSTANDING, 70
    • 4.1 Introduction, 70 •
    • 4.2 A general pattern model of events, 71 •
    • 4.3 Matrices and the strategies of compacting and complexing components, 72 •
    • 4.4 Properties of media, 75 •
    • 4.5 Boundary conditions, 76 •
    • 4.6 The harmonics and geometries of boundaries, 78 '
    • 4.7 Compatible and incompatible borders and components, 79 •
    • 4.8 The timing and shaping of events, 81 •
    • 4.9 Spirals, 83 •
    • 4.10 Flow over landscape and objects, 83 •
    • 4.11 Open flow and and flowpatterns, 87 •
    • 4.12 Toroidal phenomena, 88 •
    • 4.13 Dimensions and potentials, 88 •
    • 4.14 Closed (sperical) models; accretion andexpulsion, 88 •
    • 4.15 Branching and its effects; conduits, 89 •
    • 4.16 Orders of magnitude in branches, 91 •
    • 4.17 Orders and dimensions, 92 •
    • 4.18 Classification of events, 93 •
    • 4.19 Time and relativity in the model, 93 •
    • 4.20 The world we live in as a tessellation of events, 94 •
    • 4.21 Introduction to pattern applications, 95 •
    • 4.22 The tribal use of patterning, 96 •
    • 4.23 The mnemonics of meaning, 99 •
    • 4.24 Patterns of society, 100 •
    • 4.25 The arts in the service of life, 100 •
    • 4.26 Additional pattern applications, 101 •
    • 4.27 References and further reading, 102 •
    • 4.28 Designers' checklist, 105.
  • CHAPTER 5 CLIMATIC FACTORS, 106
    • 5.1 Introduction, 106 •
    • 5.2 The classification of broad climatic zones, 107 •
    • 5.3 Patterning in global weather systems; the engines of the atmosphere, 107 •
    • 5.4 Precipitation, 110 •
    • 5.5 Radiation, 113 •
    • 5.6 Wind, 121 •
    • 5.7 Landscape effects, 132 •
    • 5.8 Latitude effects, 134 •
    • 5.9 References, 134 •
    • 5.10 Designers' checklist, 135.
  • CHAPTER 6 TREES AND THEIR ENERGY TRANSACTIONS, 137
    • 6.1 Introduction, 138 •
    • 6.2 The biomass of the tree, 138 •
    • 6.3 Wind effects, 139 •
    • 6.4 Temperature effects, 142 •
    • 6.5 Trees and precipitation, 142 •
    • 6.6 How a tree interacts with rain, 147 •
    • 6.7 Summary, 150 •
    • 6.8 References, 151
  • CHAPTER 7 WATER, 152
    • 7.1 Introduction, 152 •
    • 7.2 Regional intervention in the water cycle, 153 •
    • 7.3 Earthworks for water conservation and storage, 155 •
    • 7.4 Reduction of water used in sewage systems, 170 •
    • 7.5 The purification of polluted waters, 172 •
    • 7.6 Natural swimming pools, 180
    • 7.7 Designers' Checklist, 181 •
    • 7.8 References, 181.
  • CHAPTER 8 SOILS, 182
    • 8.1 Introduction, 182 •
    • 8.2 Soil and health, 184 •
    • 8.3 Tribal and traditional soil classifications, 185 •
    • 8.4 The structure of soils, 186 •
    • 8.5 Soil and water elements, 187 •
    • 8.6 Primary nutrients for plants, 187
    • 8.7 The distribution of elements in the soil profile, 188 •
    • 8.8 pH and soils, 195 • 8.9 Soil composition, 199 •
    • 8.10 Soil pores and crumb structure, 201 •
    • 8.11 Gaseous content and processes in soils, 204 •
    • 8.12 The soil biota, 205 •
    • 8.13 Difficult soils, 208 •
    • 8.14 Plant analysis for mineral deficiencies; some remedies, 209 •
    • 8.15 Biological indicators of soil and soil conditions, 212 •
    • 8.16 Seed pelleting, 214 •
    • 8.17 Soil erosion, 214 •
    • 8.18 Soil rehabilitation, 215 •
    • 8.19 Soils in house foundations, 221 •
    • 8.20 Life in earth, 222 •
    • 8.21 The respiration of earth, 224 •
    • 8.22 Designers' checklist, 225 •
    • 8.23 References, 226.
  • CHAPTER 9 EARTH WORKING AND EARTH RESOURCES, 227
    • 9.1 Introduction, 227 •
    • 9.2 Planning earthworks, 228 •
    • 9.3 Planting after earthworks, 229 •
    • 9.4 Slope measure, 230 •
    • 9.5 Levels and levelling, 232 •
    • 9.6 Types of earthworks, 234 •
    • 9.7 Earth constructs, 237
    • 9.8 Moving the earth, 241 •
    • 9.9 Earth resources, 247 •
    • 9.10 References, 249.
  • CHAPTER 10 THE HUMID TROPICS, 250
    • 10.1 Introduction, 250 •
    • 10.2 Climatic types, 251 •
    • 10.3 Tropical soils, 253 •
    • 10.4 Earthshaping in the tropics, 259 •
    • 10.5 House design, 261 •
    • 10.6 The tropical home garden, 266 •
    • 10.7 Integrated land management, 277 •
    • 10.8 Elements of a village complex in the humid tropics, 279 •
    • 10.9 Evolving a polyculture, 279 •
    • 10.10 Themes on a coconut- or palm-dominant polyculture, 283 •
    • 10.11 Pioneering, 293 •
    • 10.12 "Animal tractor" systems, 299 •
    • 10.13 Grassland and range management, 300 •
    • 10.14 Humid tropical coast stabilisation and shelterbelts, 303 •
    • 10.15 Low island and coral cay strategies, 304 •
    • 10.16 Designers' checklist, 307 •
    • 10.17 References, 307.
  • CHAPTER 11 DRYLAND STRATEGIES, 308
    • 11.1 Introduction, 308 •
    • 11.2 Precipitation, 310 •
    • 11.3 Temperature, 312 •
    • 11.4 Soils, 312 •
    • 11.5 Landscape features in deserts, 316 •
    • 11.6 Harvesting of water in arid lands, 336 •
    • 11.7 The desert house, 359 •
    • 11.8 The desert garden, 371 •
    • 11.9 Garden irrigation systems, 381 •
    • 11.10 Desert settlement—broad strategies,
    • 11.11 Plant themes for drylands, 390 •
    • 11.12 Animal systems in drylands, 397 •
    • 11.13 Desertification and the salting of soils, 401 •
    • 11.14 Cold and montane deserts, 409 •
    • 11.15 Designers' checklist, 410 •
    • 11.16 References, 410.
  • CHAPTER 12 HUMID COOL TO COLD CLIMATES, 411
    • 12.1 Introduction, 411 •
    • 12.2 Characteristics of a humid cool climate, 412
    • 12.3 Soils, 413 •
    • 12.4 Landform and water conservation, 413 •
    • 12.5 Settlement and house design, 414 •
    • 12.6 The home garden, 417 •
    • 12.7 Berry fruits, 420 •
    • 12.8 Glasshouse growing, 422 •
    • 12.9 Orchards, 423 •
    • 12.10 Farm forestry, 425 •
    • 12.11 Free-range forage systems, 427 •
    • 12.12 The lawn, 434 •
    • 12.13 Grasslands, 435 •
    • 12.14 Rangelands, 442 •
    • 12.15 Cold climates, 446 •
    • 12.16 Wildfire, 451 •
    • 12.17 Designers' checklist, 456 •
    • 12.18 References, 457. 57.
  • CHAPTER 13 AQUACULTURE, 458
    • 13.1 Introduction, 458 •
    • 13.2 The case for aquaculture, 459 •
    • 13.3 Some factors affecting total useful yields, 461 •
    • 13.4 Choice of fish species (varieties, food, health) and factors in yield, 470 •
    • 13.5 Fish pond configurations and food supply, 472 •
    • 13.6 Farming invertebrates for fish food, 491 •
    • 13.7 Channel, canal, chinampa, 495 •
    • 13.8 Yields outside the pond •
    • 13.9 Bringing in the harvest, 499 •
    • 13.10 Traditional and new water polycultures, 500 •
    • 13.11 Designers' checklist, 502 •
    • 13.12 References, 504.
  • CHAPTER 14 THE STRATEGIES OF AN ALTERNATIVE GLOBAL NATION, 505
    • 14.1 Introduction, 506 •
    • 14.2 Ethical basis of an alternative nation, 507
    • 14.3 A new United Nations, 508 •
    • 14.4 Alternatives to political systems, 509 •
    • 14.5 Bioregional organisation, 510 •
    • 14.6 Extended families, 514 • 14.7 Trusts and legal strategies, 515 •
    • 14.8 Developmental and property trusts, 518 •
    • 14.9 Village development, 519 •
    • 14.10 Effective working groups and right livelihood, 530 •
    • 14.11 Money and finance, 533 •
    • 14.12 Land access, 545 •
    • 14.13 An ethical investment movement, 551 •
    • 14.14 Effective aid, 555 •
    • 14.15 Futures, 557 •
    • 14.16 References and resources, 558,
  • Plant list by common name, 561.
  • Plant list by species name, 563.



See Also

  1. Introducing the Permaculture Designers’ Manual, Chapter 1: Introduction to Permaculture, by PRI Australia.
  2. Introducing the Permaculture Designers’ Manual, Chapter 2: Concepts and Themes in Design, PRI Australia.