Natural Way of Farming : The theory and Practice of Green Philosophy

By Masanobu Fukuoka - 280 pages - 1985 Back To Books external image 5135nY-5YTL.jpg download for free from Zinelibrary or Srib

Description

"Here in one volume are the secrets of Fukuoka's approach to farming the natural way; the theory and practice of working with nature, and living better for it. At once philosophical and down-to-earth, he takes us on a walk through healthy fields, and clearly explains how we can and must change our way of doing things if we are to make lasting peace with the earth and ourselves. Photographs, diagrams, and tables provide abundant practical reference for gardeners and farmers, while the lucid text will open the eyes of the most general reader. Detailed coverage of actual methods instructs competently without becoming overly technical. This is a highly accessible book with far-reaching implications and applications for all." from rear cover notes (this book from Amazon).
"Imagine raising crops with no cultivation, no chemical fertilizers or herbicides, not even any added compost! Fukuoka has learned not to ask the impossible of nature, and is blessed with impossibly high yields. Instead of continually attempting to do a little bit more, he has looked for ways to do less, to leave off unnecessary labors, and yet his soil grows richer every year.... He offers us a provocative image of stewardship to the earth as the cornerstone to a society of sufficiency, permanence, and self-renewal" from later cover notes (this book at Google Books)

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Content

Table of Content

  • Preface, 5
  • Introduction, 15
    • Anyone Can Be a Quarter-Acre Farmer, 15
    • "Do-Nothing" Farming, 16
    • Follow the Workings of Nature, 17
    • The Illusions of Modern Scientific Farming, 20
  • 1. Ailing Agriculture in an Ailing Age, 25
    • 1. Man Cannot Know Nature, 27
      • Leave Nature Alone, 27
      • The "Do-Nothing" Movement, 29
    • 2.The Breakdown of Japanese Agriculture, 30
      • Life in the Farming Villages of the Past, 30
      • Disappearance of the Village Philosophy, 31
      • High Growth and the Farming Population after World War II, 31
      • How an Impoverished National Agricultural Policy Arose, 33
      • What Lies Ahead for Modern Agriculture, 35
      • Is There a Future for Natural Farming?, 35
      • Science Continues on an Unending Rampage, 36
      • The Illusions of Science and the Farmer, 37
    • 3.Disappearance of a Natural Diet, 38
      • Decline in the Quality of Food, 38
      • Production Costs Are Not Coming Down, 39
      • Increased Production Has Not Brought Increased Yields, 40
      • Energy-Wasteful Modern Agriculture, 41
      • Laying to Waste the Land and Sea, 44
  • 2.The Illusions of Natural Science, 47
    • 1.The Errors of the Human Intellect, 49
      • Nature Must Not Be Dissected, 49
      • The Maze of Relative Subjectivity, 52
      • Non-Discriminating Knowledge, 54
    • 2.The Fallacies of Scientific Understanding, 55
      • The Limits to Analytical Knowledge, 55
      • There Is No Cause-and-Effect in Nature, 57
    • 3.A Critique of the Laws of Agricultural Science, 60
      • The Laws of Modern Agriculture, 60
        • Law of Diminishing Returns, 60
        • Equilibrium, 60
        • Adaptation, 60
        • Compensation and Cancellation, 60
        • Relativity, 61
        • Law of Minimum, 61
      • All Laws Are Meaningless, 62
      • A Critical Look at Liebig's Law of Minimum, 65
      • Where Specialized Research Has Gone Wrong, 68
      • Critique of the Inductive and Deductive Methods, 70
      • High-Yield Theory Is Full of Holes, 73
        • A Model of Harvest Yields, 75
        • A Look at Photosynthesis, 78
        • Look Beyond the Immediate Reality, 83
        • Original Factors Are Most Important, 84
        • No Understanding of Causal Relationships, 86
  • 3.The Theory of Natural Farming, 91
    • 1.The Relative Merits of Natural Farming and Scientific Agriculture, 93
      • Two Ways of Natural Farming, 93
        • Mahayana Natural Farming, 93
        • Hinayana Natural Farming, 93
        • Scientific Farming, 93
        • The Three Ways of Farming Compared, 94
          • 1.Mahayana natural farming, 94
          • 2.Hinayana natural farming, 95
          • 3.Scientific farming, 95
      • Scientific Agriculture: Farming without Nature, 96
        • 1. Cases Where Scientific Farming Excels, 97
        • 2. Cases Where Both Ways of Farming Are Equally Effective, 97
      • The Entanglement of Natural and Scientific Farming, 99
    • 2.The Four Principles of Natural Farming, 102
      • No Cultivation, 103
        • Plowing Ruins the Soil, 103
        • The Soil Works Itself, 104
      • No Fertilizer, 106
        • Crops Depend on the Soil, 106
        • Are Fertilizers Really Necessary ?, 106
        • The Countless Evils of Fertilizer, 107
        • Why the Absence of No-Fertilizer Tests?, 109
        • Take a Good Look at Nature, 110
        • Fertilizer Was Never Needed to Begin With, 111
      • No Weeding, 112
        • Is There Such a Thing as a Weed?, 112
        • Weeds Enrich the Soil, 113
        • A Cover of Grass Is Beneficial, 113
      • No Pesticides, 114
        • Insect Pests Do Not Exist, 114
        • Pollution by New Pesticides, 115
        • The Root Cause of Pine Rot, 117
    • 3.How Should Nature Be Perceived?, 119
      • Seeing Nature as Wholistic, 119
        • Examining the Parts Never Gives a Complete Picture, 119
        • Become One with Nature, 120
        • Imperfect Human Knowledge Falls Short of Natural Perfection, 121
      • Do Not Look at Things Relatively, 122
      • Take a Perspective that Transcends Time and Space, 123
      • Do Not Be Led Astray by Circumstance, 124
      • Be Free of Cravings and Desires, 125
      • No Plan Is the Best Plan, 126
    • 4.Natural Farming for a New Age, 128
      • At the Vanguard of Modern Farming, 128
      • Natural Livestock Farming, 128
      • The Abuses of Modern Livestock Farming, 128
      • Natural Grazing Is the Ideal, 129
      • Livestock Farming in the Search for Truth, 131
      • Natural Farming—In Pursuit of Nature, 132
      • The Only Future for Man, 133
  • 4.The Practice of Natural Farming, 135
    • 1.Starting a Natural Farm, 137
      • Keep a Natural Protected Wood, 137
        • Growing a Wood Preserve, 139
        • Shelterbelts, 139
      • Setting Up an Orchard, 139
        • Starting a Garden, 140
        • The Non-Integrated Garden, 141
      • Creating a Rice Paddy, 142
        • Traditional Paddy Preparation, 142
      • Crop Rotation, 143
        • Rice/Barley Cropping, 144
        • Upland Rice, 144
        • Minor Grains, 156
        • Vegetables, 156
        • Fruit Trees and Crop Rotation, 156
    • 2.Rice and Winter Grain, 157
      • The Course of Rice Cultivation in Japan, 157
        • Changes in Rice Cultivation Methods, 158
      • Barley and Wheat Cultivation, 159
        • Natural Barley/ Wheat Cropping, 160
          • 1.Tillage, ridging, and drilling, 161
          • 2.Light-tillage, low-ridge or level-row cultivation, 161
          • 3.No-tillage, direct-seeding cultivation, 161
      • Early Experiences with Rice Cultivation, 164
      • Second Thoughts on Post-Season Rice Cultivation, 166
      • First Steps toward Natural Rice Farming, 168
        • Natural Seeding, 169
        • Natural Direct Seeding, 170
      • Early Attempts at Direct-Seeding, No-Tillage Rice/Barley Succession, 171
        • Direct Seeding of Rice between Barley, 171
        • Direct-Seeding Rice / Barley Succession, 172
        • Direct-Seeding, No-Tillage Rice/Barley Succession, 173
      • Natural Rice and Barley/Wheat Cropping, 174
      • Direct-Seeding, No-Tillage Barley/Rice Succession with Green Manure Cover, 174
          • Cultivation Method, 174
          • Farmwork, 175
            • 1.Digging drainage channels, 175
            • 2.Harvesting, threshing, and cleaning the rice, 175
            • 3.Seeding clover, barley, and rice, 176
            • 4.Fertilization, 177
            • 5.Straw mulching, 178
            • 6.Harvesting and threshing barley, 179
            • 7.Irrigation and drainage, 179
            • 8.Disease and pest "control", 180
      • High-Yield Cultivation of Rice and Barley, 181
        • The Ideal Form of a Rice Plant, 181
        • Analysis of the Ideal Form, 183
        • The Ideal Shape of Rice, 184
        • A Blueprint for the Natural Cultivation of Ideal Rice, 185
        • The Meaning and Limits of High Yields, 186
    • 3.Fruit Trees, 190
      • Establishing an Orchard, 190
        • Natural Seedlings and Grafted Nursery Stock, 191
        • Orchard Management, 191
          • 1.Correcting the tree form, 191
          • 2.Weeds, 192
          • 3.Terracing, 192
      • A Natural Three-Dimensional Orchard, 192
      • Building Up Orchard Earth without Fertilizers, 193
        • Why I Use a Ground Cover, 193
        • Ladino Clover, Alfalfa, and Acacia, 195
        • Features of Ladino Clover, 195
        • Seedling Ladino Clover, 195
        • Managing Ladino Clover, 195
        • Alfalfa for Arid Land, 196
        • Black Wattle 196 Black Wattle Protects Natural Predators, 197
        • Some Basics on Setting Up a Ground Cover, 197
        • Soil Management, 198
      • Disease and Insect Control, 199
        • Arrowhead Scale, 201
        • Mites, 201
        • Cottony-Cushion Scale, 202
        • Red Wax Scale, 202
        • Other Insect Pests, 202
        • Mediterranean Fruit Fly and Codling Moth, 203
      • The Argument against Pruning, 204
        • No Basic Method, 204
        • Misconceptions about the Natural Form, 206
        • Is Pruning Really Necessary ?, 207
      • The Natural Form of a Fruit Tree, 209
        • Example of Natural Forms, 211
        • Attaining the Natural Form, 211
        • Natural Form in Fruit Tree Cultivation, 213
        • Problems with the Natural Form, 213
      • Conclusion, 216
    • 4.Vegetables, 217
      • Natural Rotation of Vegetables, 217
      • Semi-Wild Cultivation of Vegetables, 218
        • A Natural Way of Growing Garden Vegetables, 218
        • Scattering Seed on Unused Land, 219
        • Things to Watch Out For, 221
      • Disease and Pest Resistance, 221
        • Resistances of Vegetables to Disease and Insects, 223
        • Minimal Use of Pesticides, 223
  • 5.The Road Man Must Follow, 225
    • 1.The Natural Order, 227
      • Microbes as Scavengers, 229
      • Pesticides in the Biosystem, 232
      • Leave Nature Alone, 233
    • 2.Natural Farming and a Natural Diet, 235
      • What Is Diet?, 235
      • Tasty Rice, 238
      • Getting a Natural Diet, 240
        • Plants and Animals Live in Accordance with the Seasons, 240
        • Eating with the Seasons, 243
      • The Nature of Food, 247
        • Color, 247
        • Flavor, 248
        • The Staff of Life, 251
      • Summing Up Natural Diet, 253
        • The Diet of Non-Discrimination, 254
        • The Diet of Principle, 254
        • The Diet of the Sick, 255
      • Conclusion, 256
    • 3.Farming for All, 257
      • Creating True People, 257
      • The Road Back to Farming, 258
      • Enough Land for All, 260
      • Running a Farm, 262
  • Epilogue, 266
  • Appendix, 271
  • Glossary of Japanese Words, 275
  • Translator's Note, 277
  • Index, 279http://fatlossfactorworkout.blogspot.com/