Edible Forest Gardens (2 volumes)

By Dave Jacke and Eric Toensmeie - 1068 pages - 2005
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Description

"Edible Forest Gardens is a groundbreaking two-volume work that spells out and explores the key concepts of forest ecology and applies them to the needs of natural gardeners in temperate climates. Volume I lays out the vision of the forest garden and explains the basic ecological principles that make it work. In Volume II, Dave Jacke and Eric Toensmeier move on to practical considerations: concrete ways to design, establish, and maintain your own forest garden. Along the way they present case studies and examples, as well as tables, illustrations, and a uniquely valuable "plant matrix" that lists hundreds of the best edible and useful species." (this book from Authors or Amazon: vol1 vol2)
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Content

"Forest gardening combines the art and science of arranging plants in woodland-like patterns that forge mutually beneficial relationships, creating a garden ecosystem that is much more than the sum of its parts. It involves growing fruits, nuts, vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, and other useful plants, in a way that mimics natural ecosystems. Ambitious and definitive, Edible Forest Gardens culminates years of thinking, teaching and practical experience by primary author Dave Jacke and co-author Eric Toensmeier.
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Volume One, Ecological Vision and Theory for Temperate Climate Permaculture, reviews the ecological and cultural context for forest gardening in eastern North America. The text offers readers clear and specific ideas for the design and management of modern-day forest gardens, and a glimpse into the fascinating mysteries of natural plant communities. Case studies of successful forest gardens around the world help bring the authors’ concepts to life. The first volume concludes with colorful descriptions of forest gardening’s “Top 100” plant species—a section that's sure to whet the appetite of nearly every gardener.
Volume Two, Ecological Design and Practice for Temperate Climate Permaculture, focuses all of its attention on effective design and practice. It offers a unique ‘pattern language’ for forest garden design, and provides detailed advice for how to design, prepare the site for, plant, and maintain your forest garden. Volume Two also includes a unique Plant Species Matrix and several associated appendices which offer a wide-ranging catalog of the ecology, uses, and ecosystem functions of the best temperate-climate forest garden plants, and a few edible mushrooms, from around the world.
external image 51AdEy52CJL._SL500_AA300_.jpgDave Jacke is the owner of Dynamics Ecological Design, a consulting firm in Keene, New Hampshire. He teaches courses in ecological design and permaculture and consults on, designs, and builds landscapes, homes, farms, and communities in many parts of the world. Eric Toensmeier is a plant researcher, agricultural educator, and permaculturist living in Holyoke, Mass." (from publisher Chelsea)

Volume I Preface

(from publisher Chelsea)

Table of Content

(from Authors)

EDIBLE FOREST GARDENS: VOLUME 1: ECOLOGICAL VISION & THEORY FOR TEMPERATE-CLIMATE PERMACULTURE

    • INTRODUCTION: AN INVITATION TO ADVENTURE
      1. What Is an Edible Forest Garden?
      2. Gardening LIKE the Forest vs. Gardening IN the Forest
      3. Where Can You Grow a Forest Garden?
      4. The Garden of Eden: It Sounds Great, But Is It Practical?
      5. An Invitation to Adventure
  • PART ONE: CONTEXT AND VISION
    • 1. THE FOREST AND THE TREES
      1. The Primal Forest: A Remembrance
      2. Gardening the Forest
      3. Forest Remnants
        1. Feature Article 1: Natives and Exotics: Definitions and Questions
      4. Suburban Ecology
      5. Gardening in the Industrial Image
      6. Lessons Learned
        1. Box 1-1: Shifting the Burden to the Intervenor
    • 2. VISIONS OF PARADISE
      1. Study of the Household: Ecology Defined
      2. Tales of Mimicry
      3. Advantages of Forest Mimicry
      4. The Limitations of Forest Mimics
      5. Spanning the Gamut: Images of Forest Gardens
      6. Goals of Forest Gardening
      7. Revision—the Garden of Eden?
        1. Box 2-1: The Principle of Functional Interconnection
      8. CASE STUDY 1: CHARLIE’S GARDEN
  • PART TWO: ECOLOGY
    • 3. THE FIVE ELEMENTS OF FOREST ARCHITECTURE
      1. Vegetation Layers
        1. Feature Article 2: With All These Layers, What Do I Grow in the Shade?
      2. Soil Horizons
      3. Density
      4. Patterning
      5. Diversity
      6. Summary
        1. Box 3-1: The Principle of Relative Location
      7. CASE STUDY 2: ROBERT’S GARDEN
    • 4: SOCIAL STRUCTURE: NICHES, RELATIONSHIPS AND COMMUNITIES
      1. Species, Species Niches, and Species Relationships
      2. Multi-Species Interactions: Frameworks of Social Structure
        1. Feature Article 3: Natives and Exotics, Opportunists and Invasives
      3. Social Structure Design: Strategies and Anchors
      4. Chapter Summary
        1. Box 4-1: Niche Analysis: Everybody Does It
        2. Box 4-2: The Principle of Multiple Functions
        3. Box 4-3: The Principle of Stress and Harmony
        4. Box 4-4: The Competitive Exclusion Principle
        5. Box 4-5: The Cropping Principle
        6. Box 4-6: The Principle of Redundancy
        7. Box 4-7: The Polyculture Partitioning Principle
        8. Box 4-8: Ecological Analogs
    • 5: MAKING A LIVING IN THE DARK: STRUCTURES OF THE UNDERGROUND ECONOMY
      1. The Anatomy of Self-Renewing Fertility
        1. Feature Article 4: Parent Materials: The Soil’s Nutritional Constitution
      2. Plant Roots: Engines of the Underground Economy
      3. The Soil Food Web
      4. Summary: Dabbling In The Underground Economy
        1. Box 5-1: The Concept of Limiting Factors
        2. Box 5-2: Specific Replant Disease
    • 6: SUCCESSION: FOUR PERSPECTIVES ON VEGETATION DYNAMICS
      1. Classical Linear Succession and Climax
      2. Progressive Succession to Shifting Mosaic Steady State
      3. Patch Dynamics: Out of Line and Out of Balance
      4. A “Unified Oldfield Theory”: Successional Causes
        1. Feature Article 5: “Invasive” Plants and the Unified Oldfield Theory
      5. Succession Design: Using the Four Models
      6. Summary: The Simultaneity of the Four Models
        1. Box 6-1: The Principle of Allocation
        2. Box 6-2: The Law of Vegetation Dynamics
        3. Box 6-3: The Law of Dynamic Tolerance
      7. CASE STUDY 3: E.F. SCHUMACHER FOREST GARDEN
  • CONCLUSION: ELEMENTS, DYNAMICS, AND DESIRED CONDITIONS
  • APPENDICES
    1. Appendix 1: Forest Gardening’s “Top 100” Species
    2. Appendix 2: Plant Hardiness Zone Maps
    3. Appendix 3: Publications and Organizations
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • GLOSSARY
  • GENERAL INDEX

EDIBLE FOREST GARDENS: VOLUME 2: ECOLOGICAL DESIGN & PRACTICE FOR TEMPERATE-CLIMATE PERMACULTURE

  • INTRODUCTION: A FOREST GARDENER’S TOOL KIT
  • 1: ISSUES AND STRATEGIES IN FOREST GARDEN DESIGN AND MANAGEMENT
    1. Design Elements
    2. Ecosystem Dynamics
      1. Feature Article 1: Beneficial Wildlife Habitat Principles
    3. Desired Conditions
    4. Summary
  • 2: A FOREST GARDEN PATTERN LANGUAGE
    1. What is a Pattern Language?
    2. A Forest Garden Pattern Language
    3. Box 2-1: The Oak Beams of New College, Oxford
  • 3: DESIGN PROCESSES 1: OVERVIEW, GOALS, AND ASSESSMENTS
    1. Design Process Overview
    2. Clear Intentions: Articulating Your Gardening Goals
    3. Basic Mapping For Landscape Design
    4. Site Analysis and Assessment
    5. Feature Article 2: Reading Your Soil Horizons
    6. Chapter Summary
    7. Box 3-1: Designing Your Design Process
    8. Box 3-2: Tools of the Designer’s Trade
    9. Box 3-3: Bubble Diagramming
    10. Box 3-4: The Scale of Permanence
    11. Worksheet 1: Desired Species Niche Analysis Form
    12. Worksheet 2: Existing Species Niche Analysis Form
  • 4: DESIGN PROCESSES 2: THE DESIGN PHASE
    1. Four Stages and Four Realms
    2. Design Phase How-To
    3. Feature Article 3: Groundcover Polycultures
    4. Chapter Summary
    5. 5: SITE PREPARATION
    6. Site Preparation
    7. A Rogue’s Gallery of Challenging Site Conditions
    8. A Hero’s Gallery of Site Prep Strategies and Techniques
    9. Feature Article 4: Mulch
    10. Chapter Summary
  • 6: GARDEN ESTABLISHMENT
    1. The Order of Events
    2. Staking-Out
    3. Acquiring Plants
    4. Organizing Tools, Materials, and Helpers
    5. Planting Day
    6. Aftercare: Proactive Plant Establishment
  • 7: MANAGEMENT, MAINTENANCE, AND COEVOLUTION
    1. Tools of the Trade
    2. Management
    3. Grunt Labor and Its Fruits: Maintenance and Harvesting
    4. Coevolution: The Future of Forest Gardening
  • EPILOGUE: A STORY OF ROBERT
  • APPENDICES
    • INTRODUCTION
    • APPENDIX 1: PLANT SPECIES MATRIX
    • APPENDIX 2: SPECIES BY USE TABLES
    • APPENDIX 3: SPECIES BY FUNCTION TABLES
    • APPENDIX 4: SPECIES OF CONCERN
    • APPENDIX 5: NICHE REQUIREMENTS OF BENEFICIAL ANIMALS
    • APPENDIX 6: PLANT HARDINESS ZONE MAPS
    • APPENDIX 7: RESOURCES
  • BIBLIOGRAPHY
  • GLOSSARY
  • INDEX OF LATIN SYNONYMS
  • INDEX OF COMMON AND LATIN NAMES
  • GENERAL INDEX

See Also

  1. About Gardening, by Authors
  2. Volume I Preface
  3. Edible Forest Gardens Vol. I - Ecological Vision and Theory for Temperate Climate Permaculture by Dave Jacke, Eric Toensmeier (Preface)